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Monday, May 11, 2020 | History

4 edition of Highways, ways and plank roads found in the catalog.

Highways, ways and plank roads

The statutes of New York in relation to highways, bridges, ferries and plank roads, with commentaries; also, an appendix, containing forms and precedents

by William S. Bishop

  • 338 Want to read
  • 25 Currently reading

Published by Steele, Avery in Rochester .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Highway law -- New York (State)

  • The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 239 p. ;
    Number of Pages239
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24154048M
    OCLC/WorldCa10737833

    A highway is any public road. There is some controversy whether public roads were called highways because they were constructed higher than the surrounding land so that they didn’t become waterlogged, or whether the word “highway” described a majo. The roads as named and their locations are here given. Aurora and Buffalo Plank Road - Four rods wide. Beginning on the Aurora town line at the corner of Lots No. 21 and 26 of the Mile Strip, thence northwesterly on lot lines, through Spring Brook to the Transit line at the corner of Lots No. 96 and 97 of the Aurora part of Elma.

      As the road grew more popular, the trip lengthened considerably as traffic jams and fights over right-of-way on the one-lane road became more common. (Photograph below courtesy of the Coachella Valley Historical Society and the University of Redlands.) The first road lasted until , and the need for a new and improved plank road was clear. The Plank-Road Craze. Source. Fads. Americans in the antebellum decades exhibited a mania for whatever trend promised to reduce to man ageable proportions the nation ’ s vast distances and long communication gaps. Obsessed with speed, hating isolation, yet tired of long and uncomfortable journeys and letters that took weeks or months to reach their destinations, ordinary Americans found.

    In the late s and early s, more than one thousand plank roads were constructed nationwide. (See Table 2.) For this new burst of toll-road chartering, a high percentage were successfully constructed (perhaps 80 percent) and always strictly with private funds. Figure 2 shows the plank road system in New York in mid-century. Private roads, see PRIVATE ROADS. Public highways, streets and roads defined as, Minn. Statutes Public roads, deemed no benefit to agricultural preserves, Minn. Statutes H Public ways, streets and roads defined as, Minn. Statutes Railroad crossings, see RAILROAD CROSSINGS.


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Highways, ways and plank roads by William S. Bishop Download PDF EPUB FB2

Highways, Ways and Plank Roads: The Statutes of New York in Relation to Highways, Bridges, Ferries and Plank Roads, With Commentaries; Also, an Appendix, Containing Forms and Precedents Paperback – Janu Format: Paperback.

A practical treatise on the law of highways: including ways, bridges, turnpikes, and plank roads, at common law and under the statutes; with an appendix of forms [Thompson, Isaac Grant] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

A practical treatise on the law of highways: including ways, bridges, turnpikes, and plank roads, at common law and under the statutes; with an appendix. Highways, ways and plank roads: The statutes of New York in relation to highways, bridges, ferries and plank roads, with commentaries; also, an appendix, containing forms Pages: Highways, Byways, and Road Systems in the Pre-Modern World reveals the significance and interconnectedness of early civilizations’ pathways.

This international collection of readings providing a description and comparative analysis of several sophisticated systems of transport and communication across pre-modern cultures. Offers a comparative analysis of several sophisticated systems of. In JanuaryI found a book by Christopher Wray titled The Historic Backcountry.

That led me to another of his books titled “Highways to History.” Yesterday, I decided to embark on an Out & About expedition to find the Wood Plank Road because the pictures in his books were so intriguing. I found it. Plank Roads. By Rickie Longfellow.

Historic Plank Road of the s. Used with permission from Jim Bremner of Desert USA. Many of our Nation's roadways were once dirt and mud paths until the early to mid–s.

A modern movement at that time called for the building of wooden roads, a great improvement in transportation. A team of fifteen usually laid feet a day, or about one mile a week, or forty miles a year.

One crew of fifteen, however, put down an impressive 1, feet a day (more than a third and almost twice as fast as the average crew). In the s approximately miles of plank road were laid in North Carolina. As droves of Tar Heels take to the road this summer in search of cool North Carolina mountain air, we are thinking about what this trip would have been like years ago.

As it turns out, it would have likely meant traveling on a plank road. Think of a plank road as a wooden highway for wagons and coaches. A plank road building boom started in The New York State legislature passed a law making it easier to incorporate plank roads.

The legislature also regulated the roads and established a price structure for tolls. Within a short period of time, 3, miles of plank roads. Historic roads (historic trails in USA and Canada) are paths or routes that "have great historical importance or fame".

Examples exist from prehistoric times until the early 20th century. They include ancient trackways, tracks, and roads that existed in "the period of history before the fall of the Western Roman Empire" in AD.

" The first roads were paths made by animals and later adapted. Kingston Road (Toronto) (Governor's Road) and Danforth Avenue, in Toronto, were plank roads built by the Don and Danforth Plank Road Company in the late 18th and the early 19th centuries.

Highway 2 from Toronto eastwards was a plank road in the 19th century that was later paved. Allan M. Williams (–), Ionia County Highway Engineer, had a major impact on both US and the overall state highway system, well beyond his day-to.

Some enthusiastic engineers undertook to demonstrate by elaborate series of arguments and tables of figures, not only that plank roads could be more cheaply and expeditiously built than railroads or macadamized highways, but that they could be maintained at much less expense, and, consequently, would be a more profitable investment for capital.

I owe the idea of creating an Historic US Highways Page to David Stanek who has, as part of his California State Highways Page, a section devoted to where the California US highways were located in A "thank you" goes to Joel Windmiller, "The Highwayman," who provided the postcard images that appear on my pages, including the one used for my logo.

Folder 15 Highway right of way book, near Quarryville. Folder 16 Minute book. Lancaster and Williamstown Turnpike Company.

Folder 17 Minute book of the Bridgeport and Horseshoe Road Turnpike Company. Folder 18 Bridgeport and Horseshoe Road Turnpike Company minutes. Box 3. Folder 19 Account book. Here is an alphabetical list of books about Highways, Roads, and "Roadside Features", both historic and modern, compiled by a librarian, that are currently available.

Click on the image or title for additional information and availability (purchases are provided by ). The list is frequently updated; so check back often. One Yuma merchant praised the Plank Road. “It is no ride across the Sahara Desert, but rather a pleasure trip anyone can enjoy,” the man said, according to B.

Johnny Rube in his book A Wooden Road Through the Hollow of God’s Hand. Initially, the Plank Road was boards laid in parallel tracks to provide a path for adventurous drivers.

Get this from a library. The plank road craze: a chapter in the history of Michigan's highways. [Philip P Mason; Michigan. History Division.]. In Junethe California State Highway Commission assumed responsibility for the Plank Road as part of the road system linking Southern California with Arizona.

Location Map Link. With more funds, manpower, and equipment than the pioneer road builders, the Highway Commission built a new Plank Road. of “An Act concerning roads and highways” (Chap Statutes of ) as well as by providing for the creation of corporations for the specific purpose of constructing and operating turn-pikes (an early toll road in which a long stick, called a pike, was turned to allow passage) and plank roads.

The roadways were constructed of pine and oak sills six to eight inches thick placed on an adequately drained roadbed and covered crosswise with planks eight inches wide and at least three inches thick. The planks were then covered with gravel or sand, which was hardened by .The Plank Road and the $ Bull.

Transportation was the one cry of the people in the days when John Comstock was battling to make Liberty Mills the trading center of the Northern Indiana universe.

It was anything for a way to get some place and back, or to get produce to .•Purpose is “ to promote highway safety and efficiency by providing for the orderly movement of all road users throughout the Nation ” •“The decision to use a particular device at a particular location should be made on the basis of either an engineering study or .